Interactivity in Media Arts Applications


Interactivity in Media Arts Applications


What is the nature and contribution of computational interactivity in already richly interactive spaces such as in media arts performance? How do media-arts perspectives on the development of interactive works enrich human-centered computing exploration?


Working in the context of the rich interactive space of echo::system, a hybrid work of media arts installation and improvisational performance, we are inquiring into the nature of computed mediated ‘interactivity’. Engaging interdisciplinary collaborators, this multifaceted performance develops active mediated spaces that explores socio-cultural and ecological aspects of natural/urban biomes. Across a series of design residencies in 2013, we introduced mixed-method approach of human-centered exploration methods, active observation and interview in combination with documentary capture of design meetings, choreographic development and outcomes. These methods were designed with the intention of generating new knowledge and and design insight for interactive performance through the act of both documenting and making this hybrid interactive performance.


Treadmills are used in echo::system as a virtual environment navigation system. The installation provides a dynamic, simulated walk through desert landscape. Through situated evaluation, we are exploring the kinesthetic experience offered by these treadmills. Probative observational studies were conducted in 2012 and 2013 in the context of real performance. Now a first round of formal evaluations of this novel embodied interface has been completed with 20 individuals.


With Aisling Kelliher and colleagues from ASU’s School of Sustainability, we explored the potential of exhibition as both a forum for translational research where complex academic concepts require representation in accessible formats, a platform for participatory involvement in continuing discourse, and an investigative framework for hybrid interactive experiences. Here, members of the public were involved as as co-researchers in discussions about the future using speculative design methods (e.g. writing letters to your future self, clay-modeling an archaeological object from the future). Creating an emphasis on the exhibition as an open contribution space where visitors could add elements for curation and display was important. Results from this experience provided insights and implications for exhibitions interaction design and the value of an art/exhibition as research approach.